Notification

×

Source: Agency

Archaeologists in Egypt unearth a 2,000-year-old family tomb

| 9.3.22 |
    Share

Egyptian Mummy Found

 Archaeologists in Egypt have unearthed a 2,000-year-old family tomb. The entrance to the family tomb is hidden in a charred building near the Nile in Aswan. Inside the tomb, archaeologists found 30 mummies of various ages. Some of the mummies were elderly people with arthritis as well as children and newborns. Archaeologists have not performed a dating analysis to determine the age of the tomb. But they suspect a family had buried their remains in it for generations spanning the Ptolemaic and Roman periods (1st century BC to the second or third century AD, according to Patrizia Piacentini, a professor of Egyptian Archeology and Egyptology at the University of Milan who is co-author of the study). -director of this archaeological excavation. The new tomb is one of more than 300 recently discovered around the Aga Khan Mausoleum. 

The mausoleum is a pink granite structure built in the 20th century that sits on a small hill along the Nile. Most of the other tombs were found underground or excavated in rocky hills. But this one is unique in that it was found inside a larger above-ground structure, which researchers say may have been used as a place of sacrifice.
"Apparently, due to its position along the valley that provides access to the necropolis, this building was used as a sacred fenced area where sacrifices were offered to the god Khnum," Piacentini said as quoted from Live Science. The researchers believe that the place used to be the site of their ritual sacrifice can be obtained from the marks left there. Piacentini and his team found signs of fire on the walls of the structure, possibly from the offering ceremony. However, some fire signs may also have been made by grave robbers, he added. However, inside the burning building, the researchers found animal bones, plant remains, and an offering table.
However, some fire signs may also have been made by grave robbers, he added. However, inside the burning building, the researchers found animal bones, plant remains, and an offering table. 

In addition, in the tomb in this building is also hidden the mummy of a man. The man's body is next to a copper necklace engraved with his name "Nikostratos." At the bottom of the stairs leading to the tomb's entrance, the researchers also found a broken offering vessel that still contained small fruits. Altogether, the tomb in the building consists of four deeply excavated chambers and contains the remains of about 30 mummies. Some of the mummies are very well preserved. One is the remains of a child tucked inside a terracotta sarcophagus. Other mummies are in a state of disrepair. Bandages and cartonnage, the material used by the ancient Egyptians to wrap mummies, on these mummies have been cut up by ancient robbers. 

The researchers also found a knife with an iron blade and a wooden handle that the looters may have used. Researchers say that Nicostratos may have been in the tomb with 30 other mummies, but was taken out by robbers. The excavations were a joint effort between the Aswan and Nibia Archaeological Zones in Egypt and the University of Milan in Italy. Researchers are currently analyzing and ageing the findings.

×
Latest news Update